The Forgotten Home Child

By Genevieve Graham

Rating: 5 out of 5.
Recommend? yes!
Buy or borrow? buy!

“I wanted you to know that you weren’t alone all that time. There were so many others.”

Genevieve Graham – The Forgotten Home Child

Synopsis (Goodreads)

2018

At ninety-seven years old, Winnifred Ellis knows she doesn’t have much time left, and it is almost a relief to realize that once she is gone, the truth about her shameful past will die with her. But when her great-grandson Jamie, the spitting image of her dear late husband, asks about his family tree, Winnifred can’t lie any longer, even if it means breaking a promise she made so long ago…

1936

Fifteen-year-old Winny has never known a real home. After running away from an abusive stepfather, she falls in with Mary, Jack, and their ragtag group of friends roaming the streets of Liverpool. When the children are caught stealing food, Winny and Mary are left in Dr. Barnardo’s Barkingside Home for Girls, a local home for orphans and forgotten children found in the city’s slums. At Barkingside, Winny learns she will soon join other boys and girls in a faraway place called Canada, where families and better lives await them.

But Winny’s hopes are dashed when she is separated from her friends and sent to live with a family that has no use for another daughter. Instead, they have paid for an indentured servant to work on their farm. Faced with this harsh new reality, Winny clings to the belief that she will someday find her friends again.

Inspired by true events, The Forgotten Home Child is a moving and heartbreaking novel about place, belonging, and family—the one we make for ourselves and its enduring power to draw us home. 

Link: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/52901474-the-forgotten-home-child?ac=1&from_search=true&qid=ryZFu6VazF&rank=1

Buy on Amazon: https://amzn.to/32tC2Du

Review

Here’s the full quote from above:

“I wanted you to know that you weren’t alone all that time. There were so many others. And I wanted you to know that there are people living today who care about what happened, and who are paying tribute to what you all went through as well as they can. There’s even an official National British Home Child Day here in Canada, declared by the government. It’s on September twenty-eighth.”

Genevieve Graham – The Forgotten Home Child

Wow, this book was amazing. I felt like I was living alongside Winny, Jack, Mary, Edward, and Cecil throughout the entire story. The writing is beautiful, and the story is equally sad and hopeful. It’s become an instant favourite, I just flew through it!

There’s so much within these pages that I didn’t know about. I had no idea that British children were sent here to Canada (and other countries) between 1869-1948 or that majority of the time they were treated so poorly or that there’s an official day in recognition of these children???

I went on a deep dive (as much as I could, as there still isn’t much information out there) right after finishing and I’m so sad that this isn’t something we’re taught here! Approximately 12% of Canada’s population (if not more) are descendants of a Home Child, and a lot of the time they may be completely unaware!

This book took my heart, tore it into pieces, and then glued it back together. Definitely pick it up when you get the chance 💕

Summer Darlings

By Brooke Lea Foster

Rating: 3 out of 5.
Recommend? yes!
Buy or borrow? either or!

Look, not having a father, not having the kind of family you wanted, is one thing that happened to you. You shouldn’t let it define you that way. I never did.”

Brooke Lea Foster – Summer Darlings

Synopsis (Goodreads)

In 1962, coed Heddy Winsome leaves her hardscrabble Irish Brooklyn neighborhood behind and ferries to glamorous Martha’s Vineyard to nanny for one of the wealthiest families on the island. But as she grows enamored with the alluring and seemingly perfect young couple and chases after their two mischievous children, Heddy discovers that her academic scholarship at Wellesley has been revoked, putting her entire future at risk.

Determined to find her place in the couple’s wealthy social circles, Heddy nurtures a romance with the hip surfer down the beach while wondering if the better man for her might be a quiet, studious college boy instead. But no one she meets on the summer island—socialite, starlet, or housekeeper—is as picture-perfect as they seem, and she quickly learns that the right last name and a house in a tony zip code may guarantee privilege, but that rarely equals happiness.

Link: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/49819459-summer-darlings?ac=1&from_search=true&qid=IWtDEckz8y&rank=1

Buy on Amazon: https://amzn.to/32EJmOg

Review

Let’s set the scene. Summer 1962, Martha’s Vineyard, very wealthy family, a movie star, glitz and glam! This book has all the ingredients for an intriguing summer read! 

Heddy moves to Martha’s Vineyard for the summer to work as a nanny for a wealthy family, trying to save up enough money to complete her final year of school. The summer is filled with new faces, new scandals, an unlikely friendship between Heddy and movie star Gigi, and two possible love interests. 

I enjoyed this book, but it seemed to be a little slow at times and it felt as though there wasn’t much happening. The ending also seemed like it didn’t fit? Maybe I didn’t catch some of the clues leading up to it, but it felt like everything drastically shifted. The events in the last 50 pages didn’t seem to match the characters personalities that was presented throughout the book.

I did however, love how Gigi took Heddy under her wing a little – the quote above is from her! And how it the writing made you feel like you were there, in the 60’s (or what I assume the 60’s felt like 😂).

The friendship between Heddy and Grace was beautiful. I love that they were able to support one another over the course of the summer.

If you’ve read this, let’s chat!! I need to talk to someone about that ending, I have so many questions!!!

Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood

By Trevor Noah

Rating: 5 out of 5.
Recommend? yes!
Buy or borrow? buy

“As a kid I understood that people were different colors, but in my head white and black and brown were like types of chocolate. Dad was the white chocolate, mom was the dark, and I was the milk chocolate. “

Trevor Noah – Born a Crime

Synopsis (Goodreads)

The memoir of one man’s coming-of-age, set during the twilight of apartheid and the tumultuous days of freedom that followed.

Trevor Noah’s unlikely path from apartheid South Africa to the desk of The Daily Show began with a criminal act: his birth. Trevor was born to a white Swiss father and a black Xhosa mother at a time when such a union was punishable by five years in prison. Living proof of his parents’ indiscretion, Trevor was kept mostly indoors for the earliest years of his life, bound by the extreme and often absurd measures his mother took to hide him from a government that could, at any moment, steal him away. Finally liberated by the end of South Africa’s tyrannical white rule, Trevor and his mother set forth on a grand adventure, living openly and freely and embracing the opportunities won by a centuries-long struggle.

Born a Crime is the story of a mischievous young boy who grows into a restless young man as he struggles to find himself in a world where he was never supposed to exist. It is also the story of that young man’s relationship with his fearless, rebellious, and fervently religious mother—his teammate, a woman determined to save her son from the cycle of poverty, violence, and abuse that would ultimately threaten her own life.

Link: goodreads.com/book/show/38357345-my-favorite-half-night-stand?ac=1&from_search=true&qid=jpfmeglojZ&rank=1

Buy on Amazon: https://amzn.to/2WFbz41

Review

Here’s the full quote from above:

“As a kid I understood that people were different colors, but in my head white and black and brown were like types of chocolate. Dad was the white chocolate, mom was the dark, and I was the milk chocolate. But we were all just chocolate. I didn’t know any of it had anything to do with “race”. I didn’t know what race was. My mother never referred to my dad as white or me as mixed. So when the other kids in Soweto called me “white”, even though I was light brown, I just thought they had their colors mixed up, like they hadn’t learned them properly. “Ah, yes, my friend. You’ve confused aqua with turquoise. I can see how you made that mistake, You’re not the first.” ✨

Trevor Noah – Born a Crime

This quote is one of my favourites (among the dozen more that I flagged ), because I feel such a personal connection to it being mixed (White and Black). Growing up, I was aware that I was not fully White and that I wasn’t fully Black, but it was never something that had an immense of conversation surrounding. I just saw myself as the milk chocolate. It was only as I got older, and my peers at school would point it out and try to pull me in one direction or the other that I gave it some thought and felt like I was in this kind of limbo.

As I was reading, I would turn to my boyfriend to tell him about something I’d read, and at one point he said “I was going to read that when you’re done, but you’re telling me the entire book (😂), I’m happy that you’re able to connect with parts of it though”. 

I learned a lot while reading this. I had heard of apartheid and knew that it was a system of racial segregation, but I honestly didn’t know all that much about the specifics. Needless to say, I expanded my knowledge on it, through the lens of someone who personally experienced it.

Besides the incredibly meaningful parts of this book, there are some hilarious stories that I literally stopped and cry-laughed at for an unreasonable amount of time 😂

Even though Trevor’s upbringing and experiences are wildly different than mine, there were a ton of things I was able to relate to, and I honestly think that everyone who reads this would feel the same. There are a ton of important topics that are touched upon, and spoken about in a wonderful manner. I loved it so much 💕

My Favorite Half-Night Stand

By Christina Lauren

Rating: 4 out of 5.
Recommend? yes!
Buy or borrow? buy

“Here tit is.”

Christina Lauren -My Favorite Half-Night Stand

Synopsis (Goodreads)

Millie Morris has always been one of the guys. A UC Santa Barbara professor, she’s a female-serial-killer expert who’s quick with a deflection joke and terrible at getting personal. And she, just like her four best guy friends and fellow professors, is perma-single.

So when a routine university function turns into a black tie gala, Mille and her circle make a pact that they’ll join an online dating service to find plus-ones for the event. There’s only one hitch: after making the pact, Millie and one of the guys, Reid Campbell, secretly spend the sexiest half-night of their lives together, but mutually decide the friendship would be better off strictly platonic.

But online dating isn’t for the faint of heart. While the guys are inundated with quality matches and potential dates, Millie’s first profile attempt garners nothing but dick pics and creepers. Enter “Catherine”—Millie’s fictional profile persona, in whose make-believe shoes she can be more vulnerable than she’s ever been in person. Soon “Catherine” and Reid strike up a digital pen-pal-ship…but Millie can’t resist temptation in real life, either. Soon, Millie will have to face her worst fear—intimacy—or risk losing her best friend, forever.

Link: goodreads.com/book/show/38357345-my-favorite-half-night-stand?ac=1&from_search=true&qid=jpfmeglojZ&rank=1

Buy on Amazon: https://amzn.to/2WI0jDX

Review

Honestly, there are better and more meaningful quotes from this book but this one was so hilarious. I literally make typos all the time when I’m messaging friends and this is one is pretty up there for me 😂 

It’s so bad that one of my friends has a catalogue of “Gabrielle typos” that she’s keeping for a rainy day. Sometimes, I’ll type something that is so poorly misspelled and catch myself, thinking that I’m ahead of the game. My friends either catch it first or they just know what I’m trying to say because they’re used to my tragic display of spelling.

Anyways, enough about my spelling woes. Full disclosure, this was my first Christina Lauren book. I know, I know, I see them all over the place and somehow it took me this long to pick one up! And I LOVED it! It was just what I needed as something light and fun to read in the middle of some pretty heavy stuff. 

I love that the characters were all in academia (since I am too!) and worked at a university. It was oddly comforting reading about them doing their research or seeing the term postdoc. I laughed much longer than I should have when they were joking about how to get fired from a tenure position and proceeded to tell both my boyfriend and friend who are both also in grad school. 

I don’t usually gravitate towards romance books, although I do enjoy the ones I’ve read, but this one really got me. I loved the friends-to-lovers trope and couldn’t get enough of i. I’m about to go grab all the Christina Lauren books! 

Feel free to share your favourite romance books with me! I’m officially in the market for some new ones!

Jane Eyre

By Charlotte Brontë

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.
Recommend? yes!
Buy or borrow? buy!

Women are supposed to be very calm generally: but women feel just as men feel…..It is thoughtless to condemn them, or laugh at them, if they seek to do more or learn more than custom has pronounced necessary for their sex.”

Jane Eyre – Charlotte Brontë

Synopsis (Goodreads)

Orphaned as a child, Jane has felt an outcast her whole young life. Her courage is tested once again when she arrives at Thornfield Hall, where she has been hired by the brooding, proud Edward Rochester to care for his ward Adèle. Jane finds herself drawn to his troubled yet kind spirit. She falls in love. Hard.

But there is a terrifying secret inside the gloomy, forbidding Thornfield Hall. Is Rochester hiding from Jane? Will Jane be left heartbroken and exiled once again?

Link: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10210.Jane_Eyre?ac=1&from_search=true&qid=TkwZQ77rnO&rank=1

Buy on Amazon: https://amzn.to/3eR56Jb

Review

I was a little hesitant going into Jane Eyre, mainly because it’s very long and classics can sometimes drag on a little. BUT I ended up really enjoying it! Jane is such an incredible character, she’s strong, pushes the boundaries, and consistently goes after what she wants despite her past and less than ideal childhood.

I really enjoyed the first third of the book, when Jane is at Lowood. I feel like she really found herself within those walls and realized that not everyone thinks the way that she does. It’s the first time that you see how strong Jane is, even as a young girl. Jane’s friendship with Helen at Lowood plays a large part in shaping Jane’s character. Jane comes to realize that she can never be like Helen, because she won’t roll over and accept unjust punishments, whereas Helen keeps her head down and does what she is told.

I have some feelings (some meh feelings) about Mr. Rochester. Mainly that I think he’s pretty awful, if I’m being honest. I went into this book thinking that I was going to adore his character because of everything I’ve heard about previously, but he’s not very nice! Despite the relationship between him and Jane and Jane’s feelings for him, she continues to do whatever it is that she wants. And that I really, really like!

AND the way Jane thinks (and acts) about how women and men are equal (claps), such an amazing message to shine through in a book of its time! Here’s the full quote from above:

“ Women are supposed to be very calm generally: but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties, and a field for their efforts as much as their brothers do; they suffer from too rigid a restraint, too absolute a stagnation, precisely as men would suffer; and it is narrow-minded in their more privileged fellow-creatures to say that they ought to confine themselves to making puddings and knitting stockings, to playing on the piano and embroidering bags. It is thoughtless to condemn them, or laugh at them, if they seek to do more or learn more than custom has pronounced necessary for their sex.

Jane Eyre – Charlotte Brontë

I think this quote really sums up Jane’s character, beliefs, and personality.

All that to say, I loved the book, although the ending was not my cup of tea at all, so a solid 4.5⭐️

As a side note, this is the first book I’ve read for #2020RGchallenge (a book with a school setting) over on bookstagram thanks to #JanewithSam 💕 Check it out if you like all things Gilmore Girls and books!

What’s your favourite classic? This is very close to how my I loved the Bell Jar!

The Henna Artist

By Alka Joshi

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.
Recommend? yes!
Buy or borrow? buy!

A thousand miles from the tiny village where I’d started, I was finally home.

Alka Joshi – The Henna Artist

Synopsis (Goodreads)

Escaping from an abusive marriage, seventeen-year-old Lakshmi makes her way alone to the vibrant 1950s pink city of Jaipur. There she becomes the most highly requested henna artist—and confidante—to the wealthy women of the upper class. But trusted with the secrets of the wealthy, she can never reveal her own…

Known for her original designs and sage advice, Lakshmi must tread carefully to avoid the jealous gossips who could ruin her reputation and her livelihood. As she pursues her dream of an independent life, she is startled one day when she is confronted by her husband, who has tracked her down these many years later with a high-spirited young girl in tow—a sister Lakshmi never knew she had. Suddenly the caution that she has carefully cultivated as protection is threatened. Still she perseveres, applying her talents and lifting up those that surround her as she does.

Link: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/41014401-the-henna-artist?ac=1&from_search=true&qid=ReuLSnwAf7&rank=1

Buy on Amazon: https://amzn.to/2CwF5C2

Review

You know when people say that books are a form of travel without leaving the comfort of your own home? The Henna Artist encompasses that feeling so well, as you read you travel to 1950’s India. The author did an amazing job of submersing you in the culture and social setting. From the difficulties individuals faced due to their caste to the ideals surrounding pregnancy, to the descriptions of food —- I could almost taste the food and see the sights described in the book. The writing is truly incredible.

As we follow Lakshmi through her journey to create a better life for herself and find a sense of peace with deciding to take a new path, you learn about the work and passion that goes into creating these beautifully intricate henna designs. Not only is, Lakshmi incredibly strong, but she literally built her business from the ground up, in hopes that eventually she would have the means bulid her dream house and have her parents come live with her.

The way that Lakshmi and Radha begin to foster a relationship is both beautiful and complex. How do you jump into a relationship with a sister you didn’t know you had? You definitely feel as though you’re there, going through the ups and downs of new-found sisterhood with them.

I could go on and on about how much I love Lakshmi as a character, but a piece of my heart was stolen by Malik! There’s something about him that just makes you smile and you want to get to know more about him.

Overall, this book rooted in culture and independence, and my heart was so happy by the end of it. I highly recommend picking it up!

Zoom call with Alka Joshi!

Back in March I was supposed to attend an event hosted by HarperCollins in Ottawa with Alka Joshi and Joanna Goodman (the author of The Home for Unwanted Girls). Unfortunately, due to COVID closures, the event was cancelled. I was supposed to get a copy of the book at the event, and with book stores having been closed I didn’t get around to actually grabbing a copy.

Fast forward to a few weeks ago, when stores were beginning to open again here. I was talking to my friend and told her that I had almost bought the book, and she said “well good thing you didn’t because I saw it at the store today and I bought us both copies”. Needless to say, I was PUMPED to finally get my hands on the book!

So, I made a bookstagram post about this very story, explaining how happy I was to finally have the book and another bookstagrammer commented saying that her bookclub the #🇨🇦bookenablers is reading the book this month. AND wait for it………they have a Zoom call planned with Alka Joshi that I could join in on if I wanted to! I kid you not, I cried from excitement, knowing that I was FINALLY going to get to speak with and listen to this amazing woman.

We spent the call asking questions about the book, Alka’s writing process, her life, and how she ended up being a pick for Reese Witherspoon’s book club! I haven’t had the opportunity to interact with authors like this before, and it was truly a phenomenal experience. Alka is an amazing woman and I can’t wait to read her future work!

The Vanishing Half

By Brit Bennett

Rating: 5 out of 5.
Recommend? yes!
Buy or borrow? buy!

“You can escape a town, but you cannot escape blood. Somehow, the Vignes twins believed themselves capable of both.”

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Synopsis (Goodreads)

The Vignes twin sisters will always be identical. But after growing up together in a small, southern black community and running away at age sixteen, it’s not just the shape of their daily lives that is different as adults, it’s everything: their families, their communities, their racial identities. Ten years later, one sister lives with her black daughter in the same southern town she once tried to escape. The other secretly passes for white, and her white husband knows nothing of her past. Still, even separated by so many miles and just as many lies, the fates of the twins remain intertwined. What will happen to the next generation, when their own daughters’ storylines intersect?

Weaving together multiple strands and generations of this family, from the Deep South to California, from the 1950s to the 1990s, Brit Bennett produces a story that is at once a riveting, emotional family story and a brilliant exploration of the American history of passingLooking well beyond issues of race, The Vanishing Half considers the lasting influence of the past as it shapes a person’s decisions, desires, and expectations, and explores some of the multiple reasons and realms in which people sometimes feel pulled to live as something other than their origins.

Link: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/51791252-the-vanishing-half?ac=1&from_search=true&qid=CmxxDe8ZU9&rank=1

Buy on Amazon: https://amzn.to/3hmmYO0

Review

So begins the story of the Vignes twins, and how they eventually part ways, living very different lives on different sides of a racial divide. I find the above quote to be one of the most important in the book (although there are SO MANY AMAZING ONES), because it encompasses the story so well. 

Desiree and Stella leave their small town of Mallard, a town where the founder had a dream for each generation of Black families to be lighter than the one before them. They end up in New Orleans, where Stella eventually takes a job where she actively passes as White. She falls in love with a White man and doesn’t tell him where she’s from or anything about her background, moves away and doesn’t speak to her family. Living a life she’s dreamed of, where she is not discriminated against for the colour of her skin. 

Desiree, unsure of where her sister has gone, moves on and marries a Black man, but eventually ends up back in Mallard with her daughter, living with her mother, as if she’d never left.

Both sisters “escape” Mallard, but ultimately they can’t escape blood with Desiree returning home and Stella battling her own thoughts. About how she thinks she should be treating Black people, how things might had been different had she not chosen this life, about leaving her sister.

A story spanning decades, about not only Desiree and Stella, but their children, Jude and Kennedy, and how their lives differ is beautiful. The relationship between Jude and Reese is beautiful, everything about this story is beautiful and thought-provoking.

This book deserves all the ⭐️ possible, I truly wish I could read it for the first time again. Please, please pick it up and give it a read! When you do, I’d love to hear your thoughts!

With the Fire on High

By Elizabeth Acevedo

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.
Recommend? yes!
Buy or borrow? buy!

 “The world is a turntable that never stops spinning; as humans we merely choose the tracks we want to sit out and the ones that inspire us to dance” 

With the Fire on High – Elizabeth Acevedo

Synopsis (Goodreads)

With her daughter to care for and her abuela to help support, high school senior Emoni Santiago has to make the tough decisions, and do what must be done. The one place she can let her responsibilities go is in the kitchen, where she adds a little something magical to everything she cooks, turning her food into straight-up goodness. Still, she knows she doesn’t have enough time for her school’s new culinary arts class, doesn’t have the money for the class’s trip to Spain — and shouldn’t still be dreaming of someday working in a real kitchen. But even with all the rules she has for her life — and all the rules everyone expects her to play by — once Emoni starts cooking, her only real choice is to let her talent break free.

Link: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/38739562-with-the-fire-on-high?ac=1&from_search=true&qid=SL8QPuYqlG&rank=2

Buy on Amazon: https://amzn.to/32CCb9n

Review

This was an incredibly rich story, with so much for you to think about. Seeing Emoni grow and follow her passion was beautiful. The way that she uses food to showcase her family and her culture is amazing, and drool-worthy, honestly, it all sounded amazing!

I really loved the way that Emoni’s journey through parenthood was talked about, and how you felt like you were with her through the good times, as well as the doubts. Her relationship with her grandmother and how she helped her care for Emma was wonderful. She truly is strong and selfless character.

I also enjoyed that Emoni’s friendship with Angelica. Through thick and thin, they were both there for one another, and that’s something that shines through at various points in the story.

I partially listened to this as an audiobook and I highly recommend! It’s narrated by the author herself and is amazing! 

From Scratch

By Tembi Locke

Rating: 4 out of 5.
Recommend? yes!
Buy or borrow? buy!

“We had to begin at an ending and make a new beginning.”

Tembi Locke – From Scratch

Synopsis (Goodreads)

It was love at first sight when Tembi met professional chef, Saro, on a street in Florence. There was just one problem: Saro’s traditional Sicilian family did not approve of him marrying a black American woman, an actress no less. However, the couple, heartbroken but undeterred, forges on. They build a happy life in Los Angeles, with fulfilling careers, deep friendships and the love of their lives: a baby girl they adopt at birth. Eventually, they reconcile with Saro’s family just as he faces a formidable cancer that will consume all their dreams.

From Scratch chronicles three summers Tembi spends in Sicily with her daughter, Zoela, as she begins to piece together a life without her husband in his tiny hometown hamlet of farmers. Where once Tembi was estranged from Saro’s family and his origins, now she finds solace and nourishment—literally and spiritually—at her mother in law’s table. In the Sicilian countryside, she discovers the healing gifts of simple fresh food, the embrace of a close knit community, and timeless traditions and wisdom that light a path forward. All along the way she reflects on her and Saro’s incredible romance—an indelible love story that leaps off the pages.

In Sicily, it is said that every story begins with a marriage or a death—in Tembi Locke’s case, it is both. Her story is about loss, but it’s really about love found. Her story is about travel, but it’s really about finding a home. It is about food, but it’s really about chasing flavor as an act of remembrance. From Scratch is for anyone who has dared to reach for big love, fought for what mattered most, and needed a powerful reminder that life is…delicious.

Link:https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/42202117-from-scratch?ac=1&from_search=true&qid=pyYDaoyGyM&rank=1

Buy on Amazon: https://amzn.to/30yoLZo

Review

Tembi takes you through her first experience in Italy, where she met Saro, and how his family was initially unaccepting of her due to her race. But this memoir is so much more than Tembi’s love for her late husband, it’s about how she heals and copes following his death, how she extended this to her daughter, Zoela (which is a name I just adore!), and how she cultivated her new beginning with her mother-in-law in Sicily. 

This memoire is equal parts beautiful and heart-wrenching. Tembi is extremely open with how she copes and finds her way. She reminds us (or even informs some of us) that no matter your age, the grief following the loss of a loved one is an immense feeling that you can or that you will struggle, and that’s ok. That you will always have the memories, and that you can find light in the darkest times.

The writing is lyrical, so much so that often I forgot that I was reading about the events that someone actually experienced, and the descriptions were beautiful. I truly felt like I was walking down through Sicily alongside Tembi.

I definitely recommend giving this a read, the interactions between her and her husband, and her relationship with her daughter is inexplicably beautiful. As an added bonus, she includes recipes for dishes that she references throughout the book, some of which were her husbands recipes.